Ohio Was Set to Purge 235,000 Voters. It Was Wrong About 20%

From today’s New York Times:

The clock was ticking for Jen Miller. The state of Ohio had released names of 235,000 voters it planned to purge from voter rolls in September. Ms. Miller, director of the League of Women Voters of Ohio, believed thousands of voters were about to be wrongly removed.

Over the summer, the Ohio secretary of state had sent her organization and others like it amassive spreadsheet with the 235,000 names and addresses that would be purged from the state’s voter rolls in just a month — a list of people that, state officials said, some part of the bureaucracy flagged as deceased, living somewhere else or as a duplicate. The League of Women Voters had been asked to see if any of those purged qualified to register again.

Ms. Miller, who spends her work day helping register people to vote, scrolled through the names and then asked herself a question: What was her own voter status in the state? She went online and discovered that her name had also been flagged as an inactive voter. The state was in the process of removing her from its voter rolls.

“I voted three times last year,” said Ms. Miller. “I don’t think we have any idea how many other individuals this has happened to.”

Ohio, where the Democratic presidential candidates are set to debate Tuesday, is both a battleground state and the site of some of the country’s strictest voting laws, from voter ID requirements to a “use-it-or-lose-it” provision that lets officials drop voters seen as inactive.

The combination has led voting rights advocates to contend that parts of the state are regularly disenfranchised, largely in purges aimed at those who have died or moved away, but which also hit real voters who don’t learn they can’t vote until Election Day. Election officials in other battlegrounds such as Florida, North Carolina, Georgia and Texas regularly purge their voter lists as well.

Read the complete article here.

Voting rights groups sue to prevent FL governor from participating in recount

From today’s Jurist Online Magazine:

Voting rights groups League of Women Voters of Florida and Common Cause Florida filed a lawsuit on Monday seeking an injunction preventing Florida Governor Rick Scott from participating in the voting recount for the US Senate race, in which Scott is a candidate.

The plaintiffs filed the suit in the US District Court for the Northern District of Florida.

The governor has “substantial responsibilities for election administration” including being a member on a three-person committee that certifies election results.  The plaintiffs say:

In light of the pervasive opportunities for the Defendant Scott to improperly exercise power over the U.S. Senate race, his continued interventions in the race violate the basic notion of fairness that no man should be a judge in his own cause.

The plaintiffs allege Scott wants to use his power as governor to impede the recount. Scott accused liberals of “trying to steal the election” and said he wanted the Florida Department of Law Enforcement to investigate the recount, which the plaintiffs say could intimidate election officials.

The plaintiffs gave Scott the opportunity to recuse himself from the case in a letter on Saturday, saying they would bring court action if he refused. Scott did not recuse himself from the case.